King, Luke

Thomas Bellingham mentions in his diaries meeting a Luke King in Preston and in Ireland.

This is probably the Luke King who received a non-regimental commission in 1689 as ‘Comy.-Genl. of the musters for mustering all the Forces raised or to be raised in England and Ireland. Dated W’hall 30 May … Doubtless nearly related to Sr. Robt. King, Knt. the Muster-Master-Genl. of Ireland in the reign of Chas. II’. [1]

And he is probably the Luke King mentioned in a footnote to Jonathan Swift’s ‘A Letter to the whole people of Ireland’ in volume 6 of an edition of Jonathan Swift’s collected works:

[Footnote 8: This was Henry Temple, first Viscount Palmerston, with whom Swift later had an unpleasant correspondence. Palmerston could not have been more than seven years old when he was appointed (September 21st, 1680), with Luke King, chief remembrancer of the Court of Exchequer in Ireland, for their joint lives. King died in 1716, but the grant was renewed to Palmerston and his son Henry for life. He was raised to the peerage as Baron Temple of Mount Temple, and Viscount Palmerston of Palmerston, in March, 1722-1723. Sir Charles Hanbury Williams called him “Little Broadbottom Palmerston.” He died in 1757. [T.S.] ]

In his introduction, the editor provides a telling summary of the condition of Ireland in Bellingham’s day:

A dispassionate student of the condition of Ireland between the years of Swift’s birth and death—between, say, 1667 and 1745—could rise from that study in no unprejudiced mood. It would be difficult for him to avoid the conclusion that the government of Ireland by England had not only degraded the people of the vassal nation, but had proved a disgrace and a stigma on the ruling nation. It was a government of the masses by the classes, for no other than selfish ends. It ended, as all such governments must inevitably end, in impoverishing the people, in wholesale emigration, in starvation and even death, in revolt, and in fostering among those who remained, and among those whom circumstances exiled, the dangerous spirit of resentment and rebellion which is the outcome of the sense of injustice. It has also served, even to this day, to give vitality to those associations that have from time to time arisen in Ireland for the object of realizing that country’s self-government. [2]A dispassionate student of the condition of Ireland between the years of Swift’s birth and death—between, say, 1667 and 1745—could rise from that study in no unprejudiced mood. It would be difficult for him to avoid the conclusion that the government of Ireland by England had not only degraded the people of the vassal nation, but had proved a disgrace and a stigma on the ruling nation. It was a government of the masses by the classes, for no other than selfish ends. It ended, as all such governments must inevitably end, in impoverishing the people, in wholesale emigration, in starvation and even death, in revolt, and in fostering among those who remained, and among those whom circumstances exiled, the dangerous spirit of resentment and rebellion which is the outcome of the sense of injustice. It has also served, even to this day, to give vitality to those associations that have from time to time arisen in Ireland for the object of realizing that country’s self-government. [2]

Luke King, along with Bellingham, is included in a long list of those accused of rebelling against James II. [3]

[1] Charles Dalton, English Army Lists and Commission Registers, 1661-1714, vol. 3: 1689-1694 (London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1904), 99–101, http://archive.org/details/englisharmylists03dalt.
[2] Jonathan Swift, The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, ed. Temple Scott, on-line edition, vol. 6 (London: George Bell and Sons, 1903), on-line Gutenberg edition not paginated, https://www.gutenberg.org/files/12784/12784-h/12784-h.htm.
[3] William King, ‘[TCP] The State of the Protestants of Ireland under the Late King James’s Government in Which Their Carriage towards Him Is Justified, and the Absolute Necessity of Their Endeavouring to Be Freed from His Government, and of Submitting to Their Present Majesties Is Demonstrated.’, Oxford University Text Archive: Text Creation Partnership, Original publication date 1691, 244, https://downloads.it.ox.ac.uk/ota-public/tcp/Texts-HTML/free/A47/A47446.html.

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