October 1688

For background information about the diaries and their transcribers see Introduction


October 1

Bellingham entry

Octobr 01st. Some raine. I din’d wth ye Mayor at ye Serjeant’s, and payd for my supper there.

Rawstorne entry

i at Preston & at prayers, dyned wth Mr Mayor & Aldermen of welshman’s [?]


October 2

Bellingham entry

Octbr ye 2d. A fayr day. I went to Liverpoole. I mett T. Springham [cousin] and T. Armitage [not identified], and had Dr. Richmond wth me att supper, and one Robinson, an impertinent surgeon, who came lately from Jamaica.

Rawstorne entry

2 at Preston & went to plumpton my Bro: ffleetwood & Expofer Parker


October 3

Bellingham entry

Ye 3d. A fayr day. I saw Sr Robert King in ye morning, and in ye afternoon I bowld wth him, and att night Mr. Richmond, Springham [Bellingham’s cousin], Armitage, Norris, and I sate upp late. [The last two Liverpool acquaintances have not been identified].

Rawstorne entry

3 at Preston & at prayers


October 4

Bellingham entry

Ye 4th. A fayr day. I gott my freize [coarse woollen cloth] from ye Custome house. Saw alderman Percivall [not identified], and Mr. Richmond. Dranke too much Rum in ye morning. Call’d att ormskirk on Will Patten. Stayd att Rufford and came home before 6 a clock.

Rawstorne entry

4 at Preston & at prayers


October 5

Bellingham entry

Ye 5th. A very wett day. Mr. Winkly, ye new mayor, elected and sworn. He took y oathes and subscribed against ye Solemn League and Covenant. Ye bayliffes and Serjeants swore likewise. We went with ye new mayor, where we were handsomely entertain’d. I went after to see Mr. Kennion, who shew’d me Ld Darby’s letter, wherein was an account of ye K:[ing’s] Kindness to him and desires of his speedy coming to London. This day and yesterday were ye quarter Sessions here: ye R. [Catholic] justices were not so haughty as formerly upon ye news of ye K:[ing’s] great civillity and condescension to ye R B of Canterbury and some other Bishops. We have newes of ye restoring ye Charter of London and great Kindnesses to ye Church of Eng: and yt ye D of Ormond is to goe Ld Leivt of Ireland.

Rawstorne entry

5 at Preston & at prayers and at Mr mayors Court of Election, where Mr Winckley was chosen Mayor and tooke the Oathes of Obedience & Supremacie & of Justice of Peace Town & County.

Comment

By subscribing against the Presbyterian solemn league and covenant the mayor and his officers ‘put the Anglican complexion of the corporation beyond doubt’. [1] Bellingham’s entry from ‘Mr. Kennion’ to the end would seem to mark urgent back-pedalling by James II to curry favour with the Tory Anglicans he had antagonized with his reforming and toleration measures which they saw as heralding popery and tyranny. The appointment of the Duke of Ormonde to the lord lieutenancy of Ireland signified the replacement of James’s favourite, the Earl of Tyrconnell, who had replaced Protestant army officers in Ireland with Catholics and shown himself hostile to the Protestant landowners in Ulster. In fact, Tyrconnell retained the office until after the Revolution. [2]

[1] Basil Duke Henning, The House of Commons, 1660-1690, vol. 1 (Boydell & Brewer, 1983), 293, https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=HW1_upECKUwC&dq.
[2] ‘Talbot, Richard, First Earl of Tyrconnell and Jacobite Duke of Tyrconnell (1630–1691)’, The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 2004, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/26940.

October 6

Bellingham entry

Ye 6th. A fayr day. I din’d with ye Mayor at ye Bayliffes’ feast, and was att night att Rigby’s [hostelry, location unknown] wth some company.

Rawstorne entry

6 at Preston & at prayers dyned at White horse at Mr Roberts [not identified, possibly one of the mayor’s officials] & ‘s feloowes charge


October 7

Bellingham entry

Ye 7th. Some frost in ye morning and rain att night. I went to Penwortham, to Church, and din’d there. Came home in good time with Mr. Crosse [see entry for 15 September 1688].

Rawstorne entry

7 at Preston Church heard the Vicar & receive’d the Sacremt: heard Mr. ffarrand after.


October 8

Bellingham entry

Ye 8th. A very wett day. Ye Coll. [Rawstorne] and his Lady came to visit us. We went with them to Lawyer Pattens, and att night took 3 cans att Rigby’s [hostelry, location unknown]. Nanny [possible transcription error for Nabby, as Bellingham referred to his wife, Abigail] fell ill.

Rawstorne entry

8 at Preston & at prayers & ‘ith’ evening at Mary Rigbyes for 3 only


October 9

Bellingham entry

Ye 9th. A small frost. I had ye freize from Ireland [see 4 October entry above]. I receiv’d money for Betty [daughter of Bellingham’s sister, Anne], 7-10. Was att night att Rigby’s, with Sr Edward Chisnell, Mr. Piggott, Leman, &c.

Rawstorne entry

9 went a Coursing about falwood [Fulwood] & return’d to dinner, was ‘ith evening at [Harrison insertion: Wid.] Cliftons [hostelry, location unknown] wth Lawer Pigot & Cheeta [?]


October 10

Bellingham entry

Ye 10th. A wett day. I din’d att ye marsh, and att night was with Chisnell Mr. Frankes, Coll., &c., att Rigby’s [hostelry, location unknown]. Nanny [possible transcription error for Nabby, as Bellingham referred to his wife, Abigail] continues ill of a cold and feavour.

Rawstorne entry

i0 at Preston & not at prayers, went to Swanseys o’th’ march dyned there was after at Rigbyes wth. Sr Edward Chisnall for 9.


October 11

Bellingham entry

Ye 11th. A fayr day. We had an account of ye P of O speech to ye States that he went to reigne or dye; if he reign’d he would be theyr friend; if he dy’d he would dye theyr humble servant. This was in ye publick newes ler, as allso that there was written over Sir Wm Wm’s [Sir William Williams, solicitor-general] door, “Quos Jupiter vult perdere, hos dementat, si populus vult decipi decipiatur pro honore 7 Episcoporum Fenestra!” We visited ye old mayress, Mrs. Rigby, [? No Preston mayor named Rigby] who was not well, and att night dranke 3 cans att Ratliffs.

Rawstorne entry

ii at Preston & at prayers, and at old Mr Mayors, & George Ratliffs wth Capt Bellingham Mr Johnson Mr Hodgkinson for 3 onely.

Comment

Bellingham is referring to William of Orange’s outlining his invasion plans to the representatives of the states that made up the Dutch republic. The Latin seems to refer to the madness of the times and the people’s willingness to be deceived.


October 12

Bellingham entry

Ye 12th. A fayr day. This is St. Wilfreds [feast day], att which time the new mayor enters into his office. The old mayor delivered him the staffe in the Church, and after some small compliments to each other we went to ye new mayor’s to dinner, where we were very nobly entertain’d. I was ill of a cold and came home early.

Rawstorne entry

i2 at Preston & at prayers, the old Mayor resigned his staff to the new one went all to dinner to Mr Mayors (to wit)


October 13

Bellingham entry

Ye 13th. A fayr day. I tooke a vomitt of Cardus. In the afternoon I saw Mr. Chaddocke, who is newly come from Liverpoole.

Rawstorne entry

i3 at Preston & at prayers


October 14

Bellingham entry

Ye 14th. A moyst day. Ye mayor had a letter from Generll Douglass. My cold continues very violent.

Rawstorne entry

i4 at Preston Church heard the Vicar 2.

Comment

Lieutenant-General James Douglas was the de facto commander of the army in Scotland, although James II had not ratified his position. Douglas was bringing his army south on James’s orders to support the king against William of Orange’s anticipated invasion and by 11 October had reached Penrith. Douglas’s then loyalties are made clear in a letter he wrote from Penrith in which he wrote, ‘I will be able to deal with the Dutch if they overpower me not extremely by their number.’ When James fled England the following year Douglas offered his services to William and soon saw action in Ireland, where Bellingham was also serving. [1]

[1] Charles Dalton, The Scots Army 1661-1688 (Edinburgh: William Brown, 1909), 78–87, https://ia800205.us.archive.org/31/items/scotsarmy166116800daltuoft/scotsarmy166116800daltuoft.pdf.

October 15

Bellingham entry

Ye 15th. Some raine. Here came an express for ye Generall [Douglas].

Rawstorne entry

i5 at Preston & at prayer 15s & at Ancor wth. Coz: Preston [?]


October 16

Bellingham entry

Ye 16th. A fayr day. We had newes that ye Dutch fleet were seen of ye Dogger sands. Here came Lord Mullineux and most of R [Catholic] gentlemen of ye county. They gave out Coms: ye old deputyes refused. In ye afternoon I walk’d to Walton [Hall]. My cold mends.

Rawstorne entry

i6 at Preston, went wth him to Penwortham & return’d & dyned wth him at Tirlers & my Brother, Coll Rigby & Mr Parker, was at Talbot & at Ratcliffs, & wth Mr Mayor at White bull to waite on the Ld Leiuetent. Carill Mollx

Comment

Viscount Molyneux of Sefton, a Catholic, had replaced the Earl of Derby as lord lieutenant of Lancashire in 1687 as part of James II’s moves to extend his control of local affairs. The move was deeply resented by the county’s Protestants.


October 17

Bellingham entry

Ye 17th. A fayr day. Here came a party of Scotts of near 2000, which were parte of ye regiment of gaurds, Coll: Bochans regiment and Coll Warchup’s. I saw Capt Coningham, Sr Albert’s sonne. We had three Captaines quarter’d wth us Deell, Carr, and Askyth – all very good men and Protestants. I sate up late and dranke hard with them.

Rawstorne entry

i7 at Preston & at prayers, & ‘ith’ evening the Scotch regemt came in, under the Command of [Lt.] Generall Douglas, was wth the Mayor to waite on him at the undersheriffs Hartleys had 2 officers quarter’d wth mee Major Gourdon & Cat Bellfough their men & 2 horses. X

Comment

The welcome given by Bellingham and Rawstorne to General Douglas and his officers summoned by James II to confront the threat posed by William of Orange is an indicator of the awkward position Anglicans were in at this time, torn between their fears for their Church and their loyalty to the throne. When Bellingham remarks that they were Protestants, he is perhaps expressing his relief that he did not have to play host to the Catholic officers James had introduced into his standing army. Rawstorne was anxious that such a large force should not overstay its welcome, as he made clear in a letter to Roger Kenyon the previous day, ‘… wee have 3,000 Scotch foot under Leivtenant General Douglas will be with us tomorrow, and wee hope will but stay one night.’ [1]

[1] Historical Manucripts Commission (Fourteenth Report, Appendix, Part IV) The Manuscripts of Lord Kenyon (London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1894), 203, https://ia800203.us.archive.org/6/items/manlordkenyon00greauoft/manlordkenyon00greauoft.pdf.

October 18

Bellingham entry

Ye 18th. A fayr day. I was very ill all this day with last night’s debauch. I had severall friendes came to visitt me.

Rawstorne entry

i8 at preston, they marcht at 8 about 2000: was at prayers & at Prayers ‘ith’ evening & went wth Mr Mayor to James Cowpers [hostelry, location unknown] for 3 only.

Comment

This force represented the whole of James’s forces in Scotland. They were shortly to be followed by his Irish regiments.


October 19

Bellingham entry

Ye 19th. A fayr day. I had letters and a bill from home [his Gernonstown estate in Ireland. See biography] £122, which I sent that day to Liverpoole. I play’d with Mr. Frankes att his own house this evening.

Rawstorne entry

i9 at Preston & went to Penwortha [Priory] was at Boathouse in my returne wth my Bro: yonge Coz: farrington [the son of Henry Farington?] Mr. Swetnam [?], Dr leigh & jeane [?] home together & left them there


October 20

Bellingham entry

Ye 20th. A very wett day. I tooke Physick, wch wrought well. Mr. Hodgkinson came to sit wth me.

Rawstorne entry

20 at Preston & at prayers & ‘ith’ evening wth my brother ffleet Mr Mayor Mr Asheton of Cuardale & others at Tom Bostocks.


October 21

Bellingham entry

Ye 21th. Much raine last night. This day brought the newes of the E. of Darby’s being made Ld Lewt of Cheshire and Lancashire, for which ye bells rung most of ye day. I was ill and went not to church in ye morning.

Rawstorne entry

2i at Preston Church heard the Vicar & Mr ffarrand.

Comment

The Earl of Derby‘s appointment and the removal of the unpopular Viscount Molyneux (see above) represent another indication of James II attempting to appease Lancashire Anglicans. The ringing of the bells gives a clear indication of the town’s loyalties.


October 22

Bellingham entry

Ye 22th. Much raine last night. I tooke Physick, and am much better of my cold. Here came some Irish foot of Hamilton’s.

Rawstorne entry

22 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

The Irish troops were following the Scottish regiments summoned in response to William of Orange’s threatened invasion.


October 23

Bellingham entry

Ye 23th. A wett day. No newes of the Dutch. Ye Irish marched away. They belonged to one McGuire and Rolston. I sup’t att Coll. Rawstorn’s.

Rawstorne entry

23 at Preston & at prayers & ‘ith’ evening at George Ratliffs wth Capt. Bellingham Mr Alderman lemon Coz: Asheton Mr Franke Mr Chaddocke Mr Standley, the 2 first sup’d wth mee.


October 24

Bellingham entry

Ye 24th. A very wett day. I sup’t att Mr. Hodgkinson’s.

Rawstorne entry

24 at Preston & at prayers & Capt Bellinghams


October 25

Bellingham entry

Ye 25th. Some raine. Mr. Gregson and I walk’t to Walton [Hall], and att night was att ye Talbott wth Chaddock, Dr. [Lee?], Lemmin, and others.

Rawstorne entry

25 at Preston & at prayers & mr HodgKinsons


October 26

Bellingham entry

Ye 26th. A fayr day. This afternoon ye fayr was proclaimd, and we were treated by the bayliffs.

Rawstorne entry

26 at Preston & at prayers & the Leet Court was after at Hon [Hen?]: Wildings [hostelry?] wth the Recorder & Mr Mayor & at Tirlers wth: Justice Warren [the recorder] & Mr Kellet


October 27

Bellingham entry

Ye 27th. Very violent raine and hayl. Att night I was wth Sr Edward Chisnell, Mr. Fleetwood, and Coll, att anchor. I layd a bottle of sack wth Dr. Lee that ye sige before Phillipbourgh was raysed before this day. Wm. Belling[ham] and Mr. Hilton [not identified] came to town, etc.

Rawstorne entry

27 at Preston & at prayers, Brother ffleetwood dyned wth us, went after into th’ [Town] Hall, to Mr Mayor, after yt to Tirlers & to the Ancor wth Sr. Edward Chisnall & others.

Comment

Bellingham lost his bet, the siege of Phillipsburg was not raised until 29 October. The siege was part of France’s confrontation with the Emperor and his allies, which necessitated the removal of French troops from the Dutch border, making it much easier for William of Orange to gather all his forces to invade England.


October 28

Bellingham entry

Ye 28th. Some raine. I supt att cousen Patten’s [Thomas or William] wth W. B. [William Bellingham]

Rawstorne entry

28 at Preston Church heard the vicar 2. Coz: Betty Asheton came the day before.

Comment

Cousin Betty Asheton was possibly related to Rawstorne by his brother Edward’s marriage into the Assheton family of Cuerdale.


October 29

Bellingham entry

Ye 29th. Indifferent fayr. I was wth W. B. [William Bellingham] and others att Bostocks. I layd £5 wth Dr. Worton [probably John Worthington] yt Phillipbourg would not be taken [bet lost, see above]. Mr. Houghton and Wm. Patten had this night a great quarrell att Turlagh’s, and blowes given.

Rawstorne entry

29 at Preston & at prayers, wth Mr. Mayor ‘ith’ [Town] Hall & wth my Bro: at Tirlers & at Tom: Bostocks & Tirlers


October 30

Bellingham entry

Ye 30th. A fayr day. W. B. [William Bellingham] went for London. I sent 6 guinnyes by him to my sister [Anne]. There passed a challenge between Wim Patten and Mr. Houghton, but mett not.

Rawstorne entry

30 at Preston & 3i at Penowrtham [Priory] went to Penwortham & wth my Bro: to Ormischurch [Ormskirk], all night there at John Bridges house [not identified].


October 31

Bellingham entry

Ye 31th. A fayr day. I went early this morning to Walton [Hall], where I found Mr. Houghton ready to come forth to meet Wm. Patten, who wrote to him ye night before. I disposed him for a reconciliation, and he came to town. I brought Patten to Tirlaghs, and fully reconcil’d them. We mett againe att night, and dranke a bottle. We had an account from Yorkshire that guns were heard meter [meteor] seen.

Rawstorne entry

[see joint entry with 30 October]