August 1688

For background information about the diaries and their transcribers see Introduction


August 1

Bellingham entry

August ye 1st, 1688. Preston. A fayr day. The Duke of Somersett came to this town, upon whom the Mayor and Corporation waited in their formallityes, and gave him a noble banquett and wine, and made him and Mr. Cholmondeley, of Vale Royall, and 2 other Gentlemen, free of the Corporation. I was invited with Coll. Rawstorn to supp with him, where we had some discourses about a Parliament, etc.

Rawstorne entry

i at Preston & at prayers, dyned at Swansey’s & returned by six went wth Mr Mayor to waite on the Duke of Somerset, Mr Charlmondsly wth him, the Duke invited & I sup’d wth him at Ancor. X

Comment

It is possible that the duke was acting for elements hostile to James II, sounding out the strength of local support for resistance to the king’s political and religious reforms, and for an invasion by William of Orange. This possibility is supported by Somerset’s DNB entry which details his dissatisfaction with James and his support for William [1]. The diaries suggest that both Bellingham and Rawstorne were consulted. Hewitson, in his edition of Bellingham’s diary, notes, ‘There is no mention made in the Corporation records of either the banquet or the freedom-granting’. [2] Could that suggest the corporation did not want any official record of the visit?

The Swansey’s referred to by Rawstorne could be one of three hostelries. One was in Main Sprit Weind (the hostelry is referred to elsewhere in the diaries as Swansey’s in the Weind). Another was on Preston Marsh at Ashton (comparison of entries from the two diaries shows that when Bellingham writes of dining ‘at The Marsh’ with Rawstorne, Rawstorne’s entry identifies the establishment as ‘Swansey’s’). To distinguish between the two, this hostelry will be identified as ‘Swansey’s on the Marsh’. A third was the White Horse in Fishergate, which for at least some of the time covered by these diaries had Alex Swansey as innkeeper.

Often it is unclear which of the Swansey’s is referred to in the diaries, although here the fact that Rawstorne talks about ‘returning by six’ suggests he was coming back into town and so it would be Swansey’s on the Marsh.

[1]. O. Bucholz, ‘Seymour, Charles, Sixth Duke of Somerset (1662–1748)’, in The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, ed. H. C. G. Matthew, Brian Harris, and Lawrence Goldman (online), online, 2008, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article
[2]. Thomas Bellingham and Anthony Hewitson, Diary of Thomas Bellingham, an Officer under William III (Preston: Toulmin & Sons, 1908), 1, http://archive.org/details/diaryofthomasbel00belluoft.

August 2

Bellingham entry

Ye 2d. A fayr day. Chancery Court. R. Rochfort and Mr Ludlow came here. We din’d att Turlagh’s. After dinner we went to ye marsh and bowld. Att night were att Rigby’s [hostelry, location unidentified] with severall of ye gentlemen of ye town.

Rawstorne entry

2 at Preston & at prayers, the Duke went away early by 6 & ’ith’ afternoone Mr Bellingham sent for mee to Tirlers twoe of his friends out of Ireland was there, one was his brother in law Robt Rockforde Esque the other Mr Stephen Ludloe went wth them to Swanseys. X

Comment

The Chancery Court of the Duchy of Lancaster was held at Preston in the 17th century, possibly earlier. [1]

The close familial ties linking Bellingham with Ireland are demonstrated by this entry.  Robert Rochfort was married to a sister of Bellingham’s wife, Abigail. Stephen Ludlow and Abigail’s brother, William Handcock, both represented Boyle in the Irish House of Commons in 1692. [2]

[1] ‘The Parish of Preston | British History Online’, accessed 2 January 2016, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol7/pp72-91.
[2] ‘Irish House of Commons 1692-1800’, accessed 24 April 2016, http://www.leighrayment.com/commons/irelandcommons.htm.

August 3

Bellingham entry

Ye 3d. A fayr day. We went to Lancaster and call’d att Garstin [Garstang]. Saw Lancaster Castle and Church.

Rawstorne entry

3 at Preston, and wth the Irish Gent. at Tirlers, at fells, & at Cliftons Mr Bellingham & Mr Johnson went to Levens.

Comment

While Rawstorne is enjoying himself at various Preston inns with ‘the Irish gent’ [? Rochfort and Ludlow, see previous entry], Bellingham sets off for an eight-day visit to Levens Hall (the home of a branch of the Bellingham family), accompanied by the Mr Johnson mentioned by Rawstorne, probably the Alexander Johnson of Preston who married Mary, one of the Levens Bellinghams. Of the three hostelries Rawstorne visited Tirler’s has been identified, but the location of Fell’s and Clifton’s (which Rawstorne frequently refers to as Widow Clifton’s) is unknown.


August 4

Bellingham entry

Ye 4th. A fayr day. We went over Carthmell sandes to Levens, and found ye sands boggy and hazardouse. We reached Levens before dinner. After went to ride a buck, but he broake out of ye parke. From thence we came to ye force, but got no fish. We shott a fatt Buck.

Rawstorne entry

4 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

There is a suggestion that Bellingham was combining pleasure with some fairly serious family business because Levens Hall was occupied at this period by his cousin Alan, the black sheep of the Bellingham family. [1] This suggestion is strengthened if the Mr Johnson accompanying him on the visit was indeed Alexander Johnson, the husband of Alan Bellingham’s sister. It is noteworthy that nowhere in his diary does Thomas mention his cousin Alan, even while spending eight days as his guest. A detailed account of the transactions leading to the eventual sale of Levens Hall to James Grahme is provided by Julian Munby. [2]

[1] Thomas Bellingham and Anthony Hewitson, Diary of Thomas Bellingham, an Officer under William III (Preston: Toulmin & Sons, 1908), xii, http://archive.org/details/diaryofthomasbel00belluoft.
[2] Julian Munby, ‘The Early Career of James Grahme of Levens, 1650-1692’, Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society 98 (1998): 183–205.

August 5

Bellingham entry

Ye 5th. A hott day. We went to Hearsham [Heversham] Church, and heard Mr. Ridley preach. He and ye Schoolmaster Green came to dinner with us. In the evening we all walk’d into the parke, which is very pleasant and delightfull. Mr. Tim Bankes came to us, etc.

Rawstorne entry

5 went to Penwortham Church heard Mr ffarrand 2 all night at Penwortham & my wife wth mee

Comment

Thomas Ridley was vicar of Heversham from 1686 until 1691. [1] Samuel Green was recorded as the Heversham schoolmaster in 1684 and 1691. [2]

[1] ‘The Clergy Database’, accessed 4 January 2016, http://db.theclergydatabase.org.uk/jsp/locations/index.jsp.
[2] ‘The Clergy Database’, accessed 4 January 2016, http://db.theclergydatabase.org.uk/jsp/locations/DisplayLocation.jsp?locKey=8913.

August 6

Bellingham entry

Ye 6th. A hott day. We rode to Hersam [Heversham] Head and view’d ye fine Country about. Went to the force. Saw fish taken severall wayes. After dinner bowl’d with severall of the neighbours. Sweetman, a youth of a good fortune, din’d with us.

Rawstorne entry

6 at Penwortham, my sister [Anne Fleetwood, the wife of Edward Fleetwood] went for the Spaw in Yorkshire [brought] her on her way to Dir. Shutleworths came back to Capt Claytons

Comment

Young Sweetman and Dir. Shutleworth have not been identified.


August 7

Bellingham entry

Ye 7th. Some raine this morning. We rode and saw ye colts. After dinner we went to Kendall, where we were handsomely entertain’d by Mrs. North [not identified] and her sonne and by Mr. Joseph Sympson.

Rawstorne entry

7 at Preston & at prayers


August 8

Bellingham entry

Ye 8th. Much raine this morning. We hunted an outlyer and brought him into ye parke and kill’d him, after seeing admirable sport both by land and water. We bowl’d all the afternoon with Dr. Tarleton, etc.

Rawstorne entry

8 at Preston & at prayers & went afternoone to Swanseys toth’ bowles

Comment

An outlier is a beast that has escaped from a deer park. This is the only reference to Dr Tarleton in the diary. A Quarter Sessions record contains a reference to a Dr. Tarleton of Warton. [1] The Swanseys Rawstorne was probably Alex Swansey’s White Horse in Fishergate which had a bowling green.

[1] ‘QSP/635/3 Warton — Reimbursement of Jennett Jackson, Widow, for Money Expended in Curing of Roberte Ireland by Dr. Tarleton.’, Lancashire Archives Catalogue, c1687, http://archivecat.lancashire.gov.uk/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=Q%2fS%2fP%2f635%2f3&pos=1.

August 9

Bellingham entry

Ye 9th. A fayr day. We din’d att Crookelands. Saw Sawney Farrington. Dranke a bowl of Punch and came home in good time.

Rawstorne entry

9 at Preston & at prayers


August 10

Bellingham entry

Ye 10th. A fayr but windy day. We left Levens about 8 in ye morning, Din’d att Lancaster, Call’d at Garstin [Garstang], and reach’d Preston between 8 and 9.

Rawstorne entry

i0 at Preston & at prayers & Mr Rigbyes in ’s sommer house till Sat night

Comment

Rawstorne’s mention of a summer house at Mr Rigby’s opens a window on the leisure life of the Preston gentry at this time, aspects of which are explored in great detail by Borsay [1] and French [2]. Several Rigbys occur in the diaries , descendants of Alexander Rigby of Middleton at Goosnargh who died in 1650. He had two sons, Alexander and Edward. This reference is probably to Edward’s son, also Edward.

[1] Peter Borsay, The English Urban Renaissance: Culture and Society in the Provincial Town 1660-1770 (Clarendon Press, 1989).
[2] H. R. French, The Middle Sort of People in Provincial England 1600−1750 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007).

August 11

Bellingham entry

Ye 11th. Some showers. I was with Sr. Tho. Clifton, Mr. Fleetwood, and others, and in ye evening bowld.

Rawstorne entry

ii at Preston & at prayers, my Bro: ffleetwood dyned wth us, was wth him at Mar: Wildings, at Rigbies, at Bull wth Sr Tho: Clifton & at Swanseys ’ith weend

Comment

The life of Sir Thomas Clifton well illustrates the vicissitudes that Catholics faced at this period, attempting to get along peacefully with their neighbours, yet suffering periodic anti-papist torments.

Two of the four hostelries mentioned by Rawstorne can be identified: the Bull (White Bull, later Bull and Royal) and Swanseys. The location of Wildings and Rigbies has not been established.


August 12

Bellingham entry

Ye 12th. A fayr day. Ye Curate preached twice. In ye afternoone we walkd to Avenham garden.

Rawstorne entry

i2 at Preston Church heard Mr ffarrand 2 (id est) twice

Comment

When Rawstorne writes ‘2 (id est) twice’ he is spelling out the number of sermons Mr Farrand gave that day, 2 which is twice.


August 13

Bellingham entry

Ye 13th. A fayr day. Mr. Fleetwood, Coll. Rawstorn, Mr. Hodgkinson, &c. Din’d on a venison Pasty. I bowld in ye afternoon. Ye fayr was proclaim’d.

Rawstorne entry

i3 at Preston & at prayers, dyned wth Capt: Bellingham at Mr Greysons was after wth mr Mayor to pr’laim the fair

Comment

The reference to a Mr Greyson in Rawstorne’s entry is his only occurrence in the two diaries. He could possibly be the George Grayson who appears three times in the court leet records at this period. [1]

[1] ‘October 1678 – Preston Court Leet’, accessed 24 April 2016, http://c5110394.myzen.co.uk/mw/index.php?title=October_1678; ‘February 1679 – Preston Court Leet’, accessed 24 April 2016, http://c5110394.myzen.co.uk/mw/index.php?title=February_1679; ‘February 1680 – Preston Court Leet’, accessed 24 April 2016, http://c5110394.myzen.co.uk/mw/index.php?title=February_1680.

 August 14

Bellingham entry

Ye 14th. A fayr day. I saw Mr. Rushton’s bond and articles sign’d and seal’d and sent to London. Ye beast fair. I bowl’d in ye afternoon. Mr. Fleetwood, Houghton, Blundell, &c.

Rawstorne entry

i4 at Preston & at prayers, dyned at Mr Winckleys, & my bro: ffleetwood was after at James Cowps [hostelry, location unknown] wth m’ & others

Comment
Mr Rushton would seem to be Alderman Ralph Rishton, the Preston postmaster at this time and the bond and articles would have been to do with his position. The reference to Blundell is the only one in Bellingham’s diary, Rawstorne refers to the death of a Mr Blundell earlier in the year and of accompanying his corpse to Rufford, at the same time he mentions a young Blundell; this entry could refer to one of several Lancashire Blundells.


August 15

Bellingham entry

Ye 15th. A hott day. Ye horse fayr continues. There are great store of horses and black cattle, but very cheap. I was with Mr. Fleetwood and others att ye green [hostelry, location unknown].

Rawstorne entry

i5 at Preston & at prayers, dyned wth. Mr Lemon


August 16

Bellingham entry

Ye 16th. Much raine in ye afternoon. Mrs. Patten [daughter of Thomas Patten] was marryed this day to Sr. Tho. Stanley, and Chas. Rigby walkd with me in Enam [Avenham] Garden, and discoursed about E. B. Att night I saw a farce call’d Ye Devil and ye Pope.

Rawstorne entry

i6 at Preston & at prayers & at Swansey’s ith weend wth Mr Lemon & at George Ratcliffs wth Mr Langton Mr Hobson Mr Winckley Mr lemon yong Mr Parker. this day Mrs Patten married to Sr. Tho: Stanley

Comment

The E.B. that Bellingham and Rigby discussed has not been identified. The farce could possibly have been ‘The Whore of Babylon, the Devil, and the Pope’ writtenin 1685 by the 17th-century actor and occasional playwright Joseph Haines, for which ‘he was in hot water’. [1] If this was being produced in Preston in August 1688 then the king’s stringent curbs on anything mocking Catholicism, as detailed by Pincus, must by then have been openly flouted. [2] The favourite candidate for the Hobson mentioned here is Mr William Hobson. People of the name Parker appear frequently in the diaries and it is not always easy to distinguish them. There were the Parkers of Browsholme, and ‘yong Mr Parker’ is likely to be Edward Parker of Browsholme as there are references to young Mr Parker of Browsholme elsewhere in the diaries. His father, Thomas, could be the Capt Parker of the diaries sinceThomas was Captain of Foot after the Restoration; sometimes Rawstorne names him Capt Parker when Bellingham refers to him as ‘Mr’. A third Mr Parker making an appearance is Christopher Parker, who would seem to be a member of the Parker family of Bradkirk, near Wesham.

[1] Joseph Knight, ‘Haines or Haynes, Joseph (D 1701), Actor’, in The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, online, 1890, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/olddnb/11878; R. O. Milling, ‘Haines, Joseph (D. 1701)’, in The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, ed. Lawrence Goldman (online), online, 2004, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/2429.
[2] Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (Yale University, 2009), 166–71.

August 17

Bellingham entry

Ye 17th. Some raine. I treated Nabby and Betty [daughter of Bellingham’s sister, Anne Bickerton] att a play, and was att night with Mr. Winkly, Lemon, Chaddok.

Rawstorne entry

i7 at Preston & at prayers & at Mr P [mistranscription for ‘T’?] Pattens to visit the new married couple


August 18

Bellingham

Ye 18th. Some raine in ye morning. In ye afternoon I was 20th. Dr. Roe [Wroe], Mr. Fleetwood, and Mr. Taylor.

Rawstorne

i8 at Preston & at prayers, & at Ancor wth Dr. Rowe of Manchester, Warden my bro: ffleetwood, Mr Tayler of Ormskirk & Capt. Bellingham & Mr Croston.

Comment

Mr Tayler of Ormskirk would be the Rev Zachary Taylor; who had Wroe as his tutor at Cambridge. Mr Croston would be Richard Croston, headmaster of the Preston grammar school. What Bellingham meant by the phrase, ‘I was 20th’ is unclear.


August 19

Bellingham entry

Ye 19th. Some showers this morning. Mr. Birch fell so ill in ye Church after prayers that he was forc’t to goe out, and Mr. Taylour of Ormskirk went into the pulpitt and preach’d an excellent sermon. A Scotch man preached in ye afternoon. Nabby and [I?] walk’d to ye boathous, and sup’t att cousen Patten’s [Thomas or William].

Rawstorne entry

i9 at Preston Church, heard Mr Taylor & a yong man a Stranger


August 20

Bellingham entry

20th. A fayr day. I walk’d with Collonell [Rawstorne] to Penwortham and din’d there. We stayd some time at ye boathous. I saw ye play call’d Duke and no Duke.

Rawstorne entry

20 at Preston & went to Penwortham [Priory], Mr Bellingham & Mr Lemon was at Boathouse in our returne

Comment

A Duke and No Duke was a farce written by Nahum Tate and published in 1685. Tate wrote the libretto for Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas. [1]

[1] David Hopkins, ‘Tate, Nahum (c.1652–1715)’, in The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, ed. Lawrence Goldman, online (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/2429.

August 21

Bellingham entry

Ye 21th. Much raine. We breakfasted att Kellets [hostelry, location unknown] on venison. In ye afternoon Coll [Rawstorne], &c.; dranke att ye Talbott.

Rawstorne entry

2i at Preston & at prayers & at Will: Atkinsons wth. Capt Bellingham Mr Johnson Mr Hodgkinson Mr Langton Mr Gregson Mr. Croston, for 6

Comment

Hewitson, in a note to Bellingham’s 14 September 1688 entry, believes Mr Gregson to be either Josiah Gregson, the town clerk, or his son Thomas, a glover. [1] The Mr Gregson here is probably Josiah Gregson. It is unclear what Rawstorne means by ‘for 6’, it could possibly be the number of ‘cans’ of wine he drank.

[1] Bellingham and Hewitson, Diary of Thomas Bellingham, an Officer under William III, 14.

August 22

Bellingham entry

Ye 22th. A fayr day. I din’d and bowl’d att ye march [Swansey’s], and att night saw part of play.

Rawstorne entry

22 at Preston & at prayers, & went to Swanseys dyned there my bro; Capt Bellingham, Mr Croyckley & Mr Shaws sonne of High bullock. 2s a peice

Comment

‘Mr Croyckley’ has not been identified. The Shaws of High Bullock in the 17th century included three vicars of Cockerham and a vicar of Poulton, they were related by marriage to the Fleetwoods of Rossall. [1] It is not possible to identify the Shaw that Rawstorne is referring to. Harrison suggests the ‘2s a peice’ refers to the cost of the evening’s entertainment. [2]

[1] Henry Fishwick, The History of the Parish of Poulton-Le-Fylde (Chetham Society, 1885), 76–77, https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=vyYtMwEACAAJ.
[2] Richard D. Harrison, ‘The Rawstorne Diary, 1687-89’ (typescript, nd), 96, Search Room, Lancashire Archives.

August 23

Bellingham entry

Ye 23th. A very wet afternoon. We heard of Mr. Billington’s foot being Gangrea’d by cutting a nayle of a toe. I was with Dr. Lee and some Apothecaryes till it was late, Att Coopers [hostelry, location unknown], &c. In ye morning I walk’d to Walton [Hall] and saw Mr. Houghton, and came home by ye boathous.

Rawstorne entry

23 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

A William Billington was a churchwarden of Preston parish church at this time. [1].

[1] ‘QSJ/8/50/73 Sacrament Certificates’, The National Archives: Discovery, accessed 28 April 2016, http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/rd/23e5812e-03a9-4216-9253-ad3b72d704e0.

August 24

Bellingham entry

Ye 24th. A fayr day after a wett morning. I bowl’d with Lawyer Pat, and was att night att G. Ratliffs.

Rawstorne entry

24 at Preston & at prayers & at Mr. Greenfields house ‘ith fryargate & my wife


August 25

Bellingham entry

Ye 25th. A fayr day. I was with Mr. Fleetwood, 2 Mr. Livesyes, and others att Turlaghs [The Mitre], and after att ye Green.

Rawstorne entry

25 at preston & at prayers & at Mitre wth Mr. Livesay & ‘s Kinsman ‘oth’ name caime out ‘oth’ south & at Ja: Cowps

Comment

A few days later, on the 7 September 1688, Rawstorne records being with Mr Livesey of Livesey and Mr Livesey of Northamptonshire. The second would have been the Mr Livesay, the ‘Kinsman ‘oth’ name caime out ‘oth’ south’. Mr Livesey of Livesey would have been Ralph Livesey of Livesey Hall, aged 77 at this date, or his son, also Ralph, who would have been 31. It is more likely to have been Livesey senior because, by the custom of the diary entries, his son would have been referred to as young Mr Livesey.

Ye Green and James Cowp’s could be one and the same hostelry, location unknown


August 26

Bellingham entry

Ye 26th. Much raine in ye morning. After dinner one Shirly, a raw young fellow, preacht. We had this day ye B.pp of Rochesters letter to ye Eccl. Comrs. desiring to be excus’d his attendance att ye board.

Rawstorne entry

26 at Penwortham & the Church there heard Mr. Gregorie 2 & return’d

Comment

The Bishop of Rochester was Thomas Sprat who in 1686 was appointed to a commission for ecclesiastical affairs set up by James II to further his reforms of the Anglican Church. He was one of the few clergy who supported James’s declaration of indulgence, which sought to extend freedom of worship to Catholics and Dissenters. He read the declaration from the pulpit at Westminster Abbey: ‘A schoolboy witness later recalled that Sprat had trembled while it was read’. When James’s prosecution of seven bishops failed there was widespread celebration, but not, however, at Westminster Abbey, where Sprat ordered the abbey bells silenced.

Spratt resigned from the ecclesiastical commission on 15 August 1688, shortly before William of Orange’s invasion, giving as his reason a dislike of punishing those who acted ‘on a principle of Conscience’. The commission was dissolved shortly after. [1]

A copy of the resignation letter was in Preston eleven days later.

Hewitson, in his note to a later entry, identifies Mr Gregorie as the Rev Benjamin Gregory who he says was appointed priest at the parish church. He supplies no evidence. A more likely candidate is Peter Gregory, who was at this time a deacon shortly to be ordained and appointed priest at Penwortham. When he is mentioned in the two diaries he is frequently preaching there and is referred to as Mr Gregory of Penwortham.

Shirly the preacher has not been identified.

[1] John Morgan, ‘Sprat, Thomas (bap. 1635, d. 1713), Bishop of Rochester’, in The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, ed. Lawrence Goldman, online, 2008, http://www.oxforddnb.com/templates/cite.jsp?articleid=26173.

August 27

Bellingham entry

Ye 27th. A close, sultry day. We dind att Coll. Rawstornes. After dinner went with Mr. Fleetwood to Bowles. Cousen inghams came here this morning.

Rawstorne entry

27 at Preston & at prayers, Sr Tho: Standely & ‘s Lady and Mr Patten and ‘s wife & Capt. Bellingham & his and Mrs Doughty & Bro: ffleet: dyned wth us, was after at Carrs, & Ja: Cowps [hostelries, location unknown]

Comment

‘inghams’ is here an abbreviation for Springhams, as later entries make clear. Bellingham is using the same form of abbreviation as when he shortens Avenham to Enam. No information can be found about the Springhams outside Bellingham’s diary, which details their short stay in town. The fact that on 12 September they left for Liverpool could indicate they lived in that town or were sailing to Ireland. Bellingham met a T. Springham on a visit to Liverpool at the beginning of October.

Mrs Doughty has not been identified.


August 28

Bellingham entry

Ye 28th. A fayr but cloudy day. I din’d with cousens [Springhams] att theyr Lodging. I agreed for them att Mrs. Taylours. In ye afternoon we were att ye bowling green, and att night I treated them att a bowl of Punch.

Rawstorne entry

28 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

The meaning of ‘I agreed for them att Mrs. Taylours’ is unclear.


August 29

Bellingham entry

Ye 29th. A fayr day. Most of ye town are gone to Lancaster Assizes. My Cousens and I bowl’d with Mr. Walmsley, cousen Johnson, and others, and walk’d in ye evening.

Rawstorne entry

29 at Preston & went to Penwortha was at Boathouse in our returne wth Brother ffleetwood, Major ffarrington Mr. Tho: Ashton, Exfer Newell & ‘s son

Comment

Hewitson identifies Mr Walmsley as the Rev George Walmsley, vicar of Leyland. [1] However, in other entries the diarists refer to the vicar as Mr Walmsley of Leyland or Mr G. Walmsley as if needing to distinguish him from other Walmsleys. A more likely candidate is Nicholas Walmsley, twice mayor of the town.

Two families named Ashton appear as in-burgesses on the 1682 guild rolls: that of Alderman James Ashton, who had a son Thomas; and that of Thomas Ashton, gent of Littlewood. [2]

[1] Bellingham and Hewitson, Diary of Thomas Bellingham, an Officer under William III, 10.
[2] W. A. Abram, The Rolls of Burgesses at the Guilds Merchant of the Borough of Preston, Co. of Lancaster, 1397-1682 (Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, 1884), 160, 161, https://archive.org/details/rollsburgessesa00langoog.

August 30

Bellingham entry

Ye 30th. A very wett morning. In ye afternoon we dranke my cousen Patten’s [Thomas or William] farewell, att cousen Johnsons, with ye [Cousin] Springhams.

Rawstorne entry

30 at Preston & at prayers


August 31

Bellingham entry

Ye 31st. Much raine in ye morning. After dinner ye [Cousin ] Springhams came to me and play’d att tables. I layd a bottle of sack [fortified wine] with Dr. Lee yt Belgrade was taken before this day.

Rawstorne entry

3i at Preston & at prayers & paid to the poore 6d.

Comment

Bellingham lost his bet: Belgrade was not taken from the Turks until September 6. Rawstorne’s payment for the poor would be for his Hutton estate, a burden he found irksome (see his biography).

 

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