Maps and Plans


The 1685 Survey of Preston

A detailed survey of Preston was carried out at the end of the 17th century and the surveyors’ sketch plans have been preserved. Internal evidence suggests they were produced in 1685 and they have been loosely attributed to the antiquarian Richard Kuerden, although this is doubtful. The plans include the name of the owner/occupier of each property.

Contents of this section include:
An introduction to the survey
1685 plan
Plans of the following areas:
Church Street lower
Church Street upper and Stoneygate
Fishergate
Friargate lower
Friargate upper
Main Sprit Weind
Market Square
St John’s Street area


A 17th-century Lancashire road map

A series of maps and rough sketch maps that were discovered at the same time as the above plan of Preston:

Introduction
Standish to Preston
Bamber Bridge to Cadley Moor
Ribbleton to Inglewhite and beyond via Goosnargh
Lea to Poulton
Broughton to Ellel
River Brock to Garstang


The 1774 Survey of Preston

A survey of Preston was prepared in 1774 together with a plan. They provide a wonderfully detailed picture of the landscape on the eve of its transformation by industrialisation.

Introduction
The Survey
Analysis


Domesday Preston

Map of Domesday Preston

An attempt at a reconstruction of the Preston landscape and communications in the late 11th century can be found here


Preston Moor

Preston Moor was originally a part of Fulwood Forest that was separated from the forest and granted to Preston by a charter of 1252. It continued to play an important part in the economy of the town up until the 19th century. More here.


More maps

Heat map of Irish in 19th-century Preston Lancashire
Heat map showing where Irish migrants lived in 19th-century Preston. More here.
Plan of Stand Prick fields in 18th-century Preston
Bow Lane, Preston, once had a much ruder name. More here.
A section of the OpenStreet map of Preston showing the location of Foster Square.
A section of the OpenStreet map of Preston showing the location of Foster Square: possibly the worst slum in 19th-century Preston. More here.
Map of Preston showing the districts of the town from which officers were recruited in the Great War. The darker the blue the more officers. More here.
Map of the land south of Ribbleton Lane in Preston tracing its development up until the end of the 18th century. More here.
A heat map of the census of Preston Catholics in 1820
Heat map showing where Catholics in early 19th-century Preston. More here.
Map of old Lancashire showing principal landowners
Map of old Lancashire showing principal landowners, how big their estates were and how much they were worth. More here.
A plan of Church Street, Preston, in 1732 based on the Poor Tax records of that year. More here.
Map of Fulwood Foreston and the Preston 'purpresture'
The people of medieval Preston gained ownership of a large part of the ancient Fulwood Forest into which they had been making illegal incursions. More here.
Map of Avenham/Frenchwood district of Preston about 1820
Map of the Avenham/Frenchwood district of Preston about 1820 where a major tannery was established. More here.

2 thoughts on “Maps and Plans

  1. Hi Christopher, Did you have a relative called John who lived at 215 in about 1915. Does your family have any history with Kildare in Ireland. It is for some research I am doing on a man called Edward Geraghty who knew this John at 215. Thank you gerard

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