February 1689

For background information about the diaries and their transcribers see Introduction


February 1

Bellingham entry

Feb. ye 1st. A fayr day. We had ye account of ye house voting ye K. to have abdicated ye Realm, and ye throne thereby become vacant. Ye Commons had only 8 dissenting votes. In ye Lords’ house 48 were for governing by Regency and 51 for no Regent. I tooke a decoction and electuary of Dr. Lee’s. I was late wth Dr. Roe, etc.

Rawstorne entry

i at Preston, and in ye afternoone at mr. Mayors & my wife wth mee

Comment

The Convention Parliament was called in January to decide who ruled Britain. There was was ‘a bewildering array of options’. James could continue as king, but with severely curtailed power, which was the option favoured by High Church Tories; the Princess of Orange could become queen, with William as regent; William and Mary could be jointly offered the crown; or the kingdom could be reconstituted as a commonwealth. William wanted the crown. The issue turned on whether James had fled his kingdom or had been deposed. The Commons decided that ‘the throne was vacant’ because of James’s actions. This was something of a fudge since it did not clarify William’s position. In the Lords the Tories pushed for a regency, being defeated by only three votes, as Bellingham correctly notes. [1]

[1] Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (Yale University, 2009), 283–84.

February 2

Bellingham entry

Ye 2d. A fayr day. We had prayers, but very maimed. Robert Rigby was buried this afternoone, and Gregory preach’d his funerall sermon. I was wth Mr. Fleetwood and others, first att Ratcliffes and then att Tirlaghs, etc.

Rawstorne entry

2 at Preston & after dinner at Georg Ratcliffs & at Robt Rigbyes house & funerall, at Ratcliffs againe & Tirlers

Comment

For Robert Rigby see the diary entry for 15 November 1688.


February 3

Bellingham entry

Ye 3d. A fayr day. Some clashing in ye Convention. One Bland, a probationer for ye Curacy here, preach’d in ye afternoone. I saw an officer treat a souldier very severely. We walk’d on Enam [Avenham], and tooke 3 canns in ye [Main Sprit} Weend. A sore toe.

Rawstorne entry

3 at Preston Church heard Mr Birch and Me [Mr?] Bland a yorkshire man

Comment

The ‘clashing in ye Convention’ refers to the attempts by the Convention Parliament to reach agreement about the succession.


February 4

Bellingham entry

Ye 4th. A moyst morning. I was wth Dr Roe and some of ye officers att ale. My toe pains me very much. I rec’d a noate to be assisting to a freind, which I answear’d, and compos’d ye difference

Rawstorne entry

4 went to […] to visit the Mayor ‘ill o’th’ […].

Comment

Harrison has problems with the transcription here and suggests the visit was to ‘wuerden’ and that the mayor was ill of the ‘govt’, and from this conjectures that the mayor, Thomas Winckley, was having trouble reconciling himself to the implications of the Revolution for loyal Tories. A less political reading would have Winckley ill of the gout. [1]

[1] Richard D. Harrison, ‘The Rawstorne Diary, 1687-89’ (typescript, nd), 106, 117, Search Room, Lancashire Archives.

February 5

Bellingham entry

Ye 5th. A fayr day. Dr Lee, Mr Langton, and I went to Poulton. We call’d att Bradkirk, and stay’d about an hour wth Mr. Parker, and were receivd very kindly by Mr. Hornby. Mr. Harrison, ye Vicar, and Mr. Heardson came to us.

Rawstorne entry

5 at Preston & at prayers & at Mr. Pattens [Thomas or William] ‘ith’ afternoone; & at Ancor wth Mr Mayor & aldermen and the officers then in towne Capt. Stoughton [not identified] & 5 more

Comment

Hewitson believes Mr Heardson could be an Augustine Heirdson of Poulton, but supplies no evidence. No trace of anyone of that name can be found. Also, Hewitson’s editing of this entry does not inspire confidence. Without supplying any evidence, he separates ‘Mr Harrison, ye Vicar’ into two people: a Mr Harrison as a member of the Bankfield family and the vicar as the Rev Richard Clegg of Kirkham. In fact, Mr Harrison was Richard Harrison, vicar of Poulton. [1]

[1] Thomas Bellingham and Anthony Hewitson, Diary of Thomas Bellingham, an Officer under William III (Preston: Toulmin & Sons, 1908), 48, http://archive.org/details/diaryofthomasbel00belluoft.

February 6

Bellingham entry

Ye 6th. A fayr day. Capt Veal came to us. We went a coursing, and had an excellent course. Capt. Westby, Mr. Parker, and young Westby mett us, and came and din’d wth us. In ye evening we went to see Mr. Barton’s mother and sisters: one is marry’d to one Peatson, and ye other, Mrs Prudence, is unmarry’d; she is pretty but inclinable to grow fatt.

Rawstorne entry

6 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

The two Westbys would be members of the Westby family, prominent Fylde Catholic gentry. Mr Parker was probably Christopher Parker. Hewitson asserts that Peatson was James Patteson of Poulton-le-Fylde, but supplies no evidence. [1]

[1] Ibid., 49.

February 7

Bellingham entry

Ye 7th. A fayr day. Mr. Hornby went early to Liverpoole. We came away about 11 o’clock. Overtook Mrs Parker in her Rollioon wth 2 sisters. I call’d att Freckleton. Saw Mr. Sharpless wife of Dublin [not identified]. Came to Mr. Chaddocks ship, att ye nebb of Neas [Neb of the Naze or Naze Mount, on the Ribble near Freckleton]. Met Mr. Richmond there. Eat and dranke and play’d about an houre. Got home before 5 of ye clock. Saw Mr. Kennyon att Mr. Hodgkinsons, and play’d a game att Tables wth him.

Rawstorne entry

7 at Preston & at prayers dyned at Ned Cravens wth Coll Rigby Mr Parker [of Browsholme or Bradkirk] Mr Longworth & Mr Kenion & others was after at Serjeant Walle’s [White Horse] & Ancor & Brought Mr Kenion to Mr HodgKinsons

Comment

Mrs Parker would have been a member of the Parker family of Bradkirk and her Rollioon was presumably her carriage. Daniel Chaddock was a Preston wine merchant, and his ship would be bringing a consignment of wine, possibly from Bordeaux.


February 8

Bellingham entry

Ye 8th. A fayr day. I was wth Mr. Kennyon all ye afternoon. Ye Lords and Commons can not yett agree about ye words abdicated and deserted. I was late at play att Mr. Hodgkinson’s, and lost some money to Mr. Kennyon.

Rawstorne entry

8 at Preston & at Penwortham was at Boathouse in my returne wth: B: ff

Comment

The Convention Parliament was still trying to reconcile its differences about the succession. See above.


February 9

Bellingham entry

Ye 9th. Some raine last night: a fayr day. I sent my dogg to be taught. Nabby was Church’d [the church ceremony for women following childbirth]. I gave my sisters bill to Marsden’s man [not identified]. Was wth Mr. Hornby and Sharpless [not identified], and after wth Mr. Fleetwood.

Rawstorne entry

9 at Preston & at Margret Wildings [hostelry, location unknown] and Hugh Tootells wth my bro: ff [Edward Fleetwood] & others


February 10

Bellingham entry

Ye 10th. A dry day. We had ye account of ye P and P of O [Prince and Princess of Orange] being declar’d K and Q [King and Queen] by ye Lords. Ye curate [Bland] preach’d a very ingenious sermon about unity. I saw Mr. James Ashton, who came lately from Ireland.

Rawstorne entry

i0 at Preston & the Church heard Mr Birch and Mr Bland

Comment

The Convention Parliament had delivered William of Orange the decision he wanted.


February 11

Bellingham entry

Ye 11th. A dry day. We went a coursing towards Lea; kill’d a lease of hares; din’d att Swansy’s; came home in good time wth ye officers, and went after to ye Serjeant’s. This day was ye drunken jury [?]. Nabby went home to her nurse.

Rawstorne entry

ii at Preston & at prayers, & at Mr Rigbies Christeninge of ‘s Daughter Hennta My wife stood for the Lady Persall [not identified] & Mrs Greenfield [probably the wife of Christopher Greenfield or possibly his elder brother Thomas] for Mrs Betty Mollineux [not identified] and I for Capt Lane: [not identified] was at Ser: Walls’ with Capt. Staughton [not identified] & officers & Capt Belling [the diarist]

Comment

Henrietta, daughter of Edward Rigby, was probably the person who left a bequest of £100 in her will in 1741, the interest from which was to be distributed annually to six of the poorest widows in the town. [1]

[1] Henry Fishwick, The History of the Parish of Preston (Rochdale: The Aldine Press, 1900), 391.

February 12

Bellingham entry

Ye 12th. A windy day. Great cock fighting. Sr Tho Stanley lost every battle. I had good newes from Ireland, yt ye Prot were in good posture of defence. I was a little while wth Mr. Fleetwood and others att ye bowling green house [hostelry, location unknown], and came home early.

Rawstorne entry

i2 at Preston & at prayers. my bro ffleetwood & Coz: ffarringotns [probably Henry Farington] dyned wth ‘s


February 13

Bellingham entry

Ye 13th. Some raine. Cocking continues. Coll St. John’s [not identified] came to this town. He confin’d Lewt. Roche [not identified]. I was wth him, and treated him att ye Dogg, and after sup’t wth him att ye anchor where I stay’d late and dranke.

Rawstorne entry

i3 at Preston & at prayers & at James Cowpers [hostelry, location unknown] & at Peg Swansey’s [probably the hostelry in Main Sprit Weind] with Mr Johnson Dr Leigh & others


February 14

Bellingham entry

Ye 14th. A fayr day. This being appoint’d a thanksgiving for our deliverance from popery, etc., we had prayers and a sermon. After dinner I was wth ye mayor and officers att Coopers [hostelry, location unknown], and then I treat’d ye officers att a bowl of punch att ye anchor and stay’d late. Capt Collier [not identified] came this day to town.

Rawstorne entry

i4 at Preston & at Church ’twas the Thancksgiving for our di’livera’ce from Popery & Slavery & Arbitrary Power, was ‘ith’ evening wth Leiuetent: Coll Sr. Jones [not identified] Capt Collier Capt Staughton [not identified] & the rest of the officers at Mr Ja: Cowp’s [or Cooper’s] and at the Ancor a Bowle of Punch at Capt. Bellingham’s Cost.

Comment

The anti-popery ceremony and sermon, which would seem to be aimed at James II, did not bode well for the security of local Catholics. Bellingham and Rawstorne seem now to fully accepting William’s assumption of the throne, there is no hint of Jacobitism in these entries.


February 15

Bellingham entry

Ye 15th. A moyst day; much rain in ye night. Coll. St. Johns went home. We had an account ot ye Pes of O [Princess of Orange] landing att London on Tuesday last. One Mr. Peper of Ireland and his wife came to this town. Here came Dean Pullein, Mr. Mead and Lee, 2 Bulleris, Ellwood, and Billy Graves. They landed att Whithaven, and bring a most dismall account of affayres in ye north [of Ireland]. I wrote a very long letter to my cousen Frowde, to be communicated to my Ld Clarendon, about ye present state of affayres there. Stayd wth ye Dean till very late.

Rawstorne entry

15 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

Henry Hyde, second earl of Clarendon, was appointed lord lieutenant of Ireland in 1685 but his position was undermined by Tyrconnel who towards the end of James II’s reign assumed control of Ireland, lending his support to Catholics and oppressing Protestants. Bellingham presumably supposed that Clarendon had influence with William in matters concerning Ireland. Bellingham would be basing his account on his discussions with Pullein and his companions (not identified) fleeing Ireland.


February 16

Bellingham entry

Ye 16th. A fayr day. Dean Pullein and ye gentlemen came to pay my wife a visitt, and so went to Liverpoole. Capt Wescomb, son to ye late Consull att Cadiz, came to town. I was wth him att ye mitre, and after Capt Stoughton treat’d ye Mayor, Aldermen, Mr. Fleetwood, and severall others, att ye Serjeant’s, where we were entertain’d wth wine, anchioves, and excellent musick.

Rawstorne entry

i6 at Preston & at prayers i6 was wth the Officers at Sert: Wall’s heard their howboyes & was too late ’till past 12 at night


February 17

Bellingham entry

Ye 17th. A moyst day. We had an acct of ye new King and Queen being proclaim’d last Wednesday, att London, wth much joy. Capt. Wescomb went hence. Mr. Franks payd away att Rigby’s, being to goe for London.

Rawstorne entry

i7 went to Penwortham heard Mr. Gregory the Newes came of the procaliming the Prince & Princess of Orange King and Queen &c

February 18

Bellingham entry

Ye 18th. A dry, cold day. This morning came a letter from ye King and Counsell, directed to ye Sherriffe or to ye Coroners, to Proclame the new K and Q, wch was done wth great solemnity att ye Cross. After we went to ye mayors, so to Mittons, then to ye bonfire, and from thence to Tirlaghs, att all wch places we drank theyr healths; ye soldiers fir’d severall volleys; and concluded all wth bonfires and ringing of bells.

Rawstorne entry

i8 at Preston & at prayers & at 2 after noon, went wth Mr Mayor into the Town Hall & after to the Cros where King William & Queen Mary were pr’laimed K & Q of England was after at Margret Wildings at Tirlers, & George Ratcliffs wth. Mr Mayor & many others. X

February 19

Bellingham entry

Ye 19th. A hard frost. Nabby was very ill. Ye curate, Mr. Bland, is return’d. I tooke Lodgings att Mr. Walmesleys for my sister. I fell out wth my friend. Att night I was wth Mr. Pepper, of Ireland, and Mr. Walmesley. One Woodwood att Mr. Mayors, a lame clerke, spoake very saucily to D. Langton, and sayd yt ye rising on ye Blundering Saturday was to cutt ye Papists’ throats. Cousen Peers.

Rawstorne entry

i9 at Preston & at prayers

February 20

Bellingham entry

Ye 20th. A wett day. Nabby continues very ill of a looseness. I din’d att my cousen Patten’s, where we entertain’d ye Ladyes wth ye musick.

Rawstorne entry

20 at Preston & at prayers & afternoone at Boathouse wth Mr Mayor & my brother ffleetwood

February 21

Bellingham entry

Ye 21th. A wett day. Nabby recovers. We din’d att my cousen Patten’s, and sup’t att cousen Johnson’s, and had a bowl of Punch. Ye women, all but Nabby, were very peevish and ill humour’d.

Rawstorne entry

2i at Preston & at prayers

February 22

Bellingham entry

Ye 22th. A fayr day. We were going parte of ye way wth cousen Peers and Betty gott a violent fall, of which she was dangerously ill. I receiv’d letters from Ireland yt ye Prot were 40,000 strong. I dranke wth T. Banks, and went late home wth cousen Peers, Ye men muster’d.

Rawstorne entry

22 at Preston & at prayers

Bellingham entry

Ye 23th. A fayr day. I receiv’d my sister’s mony. Betty B recovers. Some papists disarm’d, but theyr swords restor’d them again. Capt Stoughton and Rock came and play’d with me att Grand Trick track. I was wth Mr Fleetwood and others att Turlagh’s.

Rawstorne entry

23 at Preston & at prayers & at Tirlers wth. Brother ffleetwood Capt Bellingham Capt Satughton and others.

February 24

Bellingham entry

Ye 24th. A fayr day. Mr Gregory preach’d in ye morning and the Curate in ye afternoon. I din’d wth Capt Stoughton att cousen Johnson’s. Betty recovers well.

Rawstorne entry

24 at Preston heard Mr. Gregory and Mr Bland.

February 25

Bellingham entry

Ye 25th. A fayr day. Stoughton, Coll, etc. We went to Penwortham: cours’d and din’d there. Went to ye town, and where some words happen’d between Roch and little Heron, and a lye was given. We part’d them, and came home early. Ye gout troublesme [as original].

Rawstorne entry

25 at Preston & went to Penwortham & a Coursing, dyned ther and was at Town=end wth Bro: & the Captaines above menc’oed

February 26

Bellingham entry

Ye 26th. A very fayr day. Mr. Gregson went towards London. I went as far as Whittles wth him. Came home by Lealand, where I saw Capt Wescomb and Mr. Wamsly. Sr J. Coghill was again here to see me. I receiv’d ye declaration for Ireland. I am very ill wth my toe, and Nabby has taken a violent scowring wch much indisposes her. Capt Stoughton receiv’d an express to give a faythful account upon word and honour w[hat] effective men there are in these companyes. I play’d wth him att grand trick track att Coll. Rawstornes.

Rawstorne entry

26 at Preston & went to Hutton & return’d to dinner was afyer at George Ratcliffs for 3 only.

February 27

Bellingham entry

Ye 27th. A very fayr day. Nabby was dangerously ill last night, but tooke some powders and Julep, and is much better. I gott a stray’d horse which was challeng’d and taken from Yorkshire.

Rawstorne entry

27 at Preston & at prayers

February 28

Bellingham entry

Ye 28th. A stormy, wett day. I went wth cousens Patten and Johnson to Goosnar. Mr. Threlfall and his wife came and din’d wth us and brought a brace of carps. We were very hearty. I saw Capt Stoughton after I came home. My cousen Patten was ill. Nabby recovers. I feed Dr. Lee this morning.

Rawstorne entry

28 at Preston & at prayers, my wife gave me 5d for expenses