November 1688

For background information about the diaries and their transcribers see Introduction


November 1

Bellingham entry

Novembr ye 1st, 1688. A very fayr day. It being my birth[day] I treated some freindes, and att night was in Mr. Piggotts room. I gave Mr. Hebson [Hobson] halfe a crown, to receive 4 for it if ye Dutch invaded us before twelfth day next. [Bellingham won his bet, William of Orange invaded on 5 November]

Rawstorne entry

i went to Knowsley, my Ld, Derby sent for us & others his old Duputie Leuetents. came there before dinner & was a Prayers ‘ith’ Chapell there all night at Knowsley. X

Comment

In 1687, when James II replaced the Earl of Derby with the Catholic Viscount Molyneux as lord lieutenant of Lancashire, the Anglican deputy lieutenants  refused to serve under the new man. Late in 1688 when James was trying to placate the Anglicans he reappointed Derby who then brought back his old deputy lieutenants.


November 2

Bellingham entry

Ye 2d. A fayr day. I walk’d on ye moore in ye morning.

Rawstorne entry

2 came thence at ii & to Ormischurch [Ormskirk] and from thence to Rufforth [Rufford], all night there & Coll Rigby wth us.


November 3

Bellingham entry

Ye 3d. A fayr day, but high wind. Att E[ast]. I Tooke Physik which wrought very kindly.

Rawstorne entry

3 came from Rufforth [Rufford] after Dinne & soe home to Preston


November 4

Bellingham entry

Ye 4th. A fayr day: high E wind. Ye H: Eu: [Holy Eucharist] was celebrated, and I received. Mr. Hodgkinson, Deputy Mayor.

Rawstorne entry

4 went to Penwortham [Priory] & the Church heard Mr Gregorie my wife & Coz: Asheton [Betty Assheton was staying with Rawstornes] & the Children & return’d.


November 5

Bellingham entry

Ye 5th. A moyst day. Mr. Piggott and I walk’d to Walton [Hall]. The [gunpowder plot] anniversary was kept there wth much modesty prayers, ringing of bells, and few bonefires.

Rawstorne entry

5 at Preston & at prayers ‘ith’ evening was at Talbot wth Capt Belingham, Mr lemon Dr Leigh & others for 3 only


November 6

Bellingham entry

Ye 6th. A fayr day. I had an account of ye Dutch being seen between Dover and Callis, on Saturday last att one a clock, steering towards ye west of England. This day I assigned my bill wth Mr. Wm. Clayton, and receiv’d £20 of him in money and £30 on demaund, and from Mr. Cottam a noates from Mr. Clayton of £30 on demaund, and from Cottham for £40 payable within 10 dayes. I was great parte of ye afternoone wth Mr. Swetman [and] Mr. Wamsly.

Rawstorne entry

6 went to Banck, & my bro: ffleet and Mr Mayor, abt anulling the setlements [?] heretofore made &c

Comment

William of Orange had been expected to land on the Yorkshire coast; here the news arrives that he is instead heading west. William Clayton would have been the son of Robert Clayton of Fulwood. He was establishing himself in Liverpool at this time and would go on to represent the town as MP. [1] A Mr Cottam appears on two other occasions in the diaries; he could have been William Cottam, common council member.

[1] Eveline Cruickshanks and Richard Harrison, ‘Clayton, William (aft.1650-1715), of Fulwood, Nr. Preston and Water Street, Liverpool, Lancs. | History of Parliament Online’, The History of Parliament, accessed 8 January 2016, http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1690-1715/member/clayton-william-1650-1715#biography.

November 7

Bellingham entry

Ye 7th. A moyst day. Betty [daughter of Bellingham’s sister, Anne] was not well. We eat oysters att ye anchor, which came fresh from London.

Rawstorne entry

7 at Preston & at prayers


November 8

Bellingham entry

Ye 8th. A fayr day. Mr. Chaddock, Mr. Franks, and I walk’d to Penwortham [Priory], and din’d there, and call’d att ye boat house wth Mr. Fleetwood and Dr. Lee.

Rawstorne entry

8 at Preston & at prayers X


November 9

Bellingham entry

Ye 9th. A wett day. We receiv’d ye newes of ye Dutch landing att Dartmouth, Torbay, and Exmouth, in ye west of England, on Monday last, etc.

Rawstorne entry

9 at Preston & at prayers this day the Newes of the Dutch landing came, at Exmouth, Turbay & Dartmouth

Comment

The news of the Prince of Orange’s invasion on 5 November has reached Preston four days later.


November 10

Bellingham entry

Ye 10th. A fayr but cloudy day. In ye afternoone I was wth Mr. Fleetwood, Mr. Osberston [Osbaldeston], and others att Bostock’s, Mitre, and Rattliffes. I mett a hott man att ye coffee house who inveigh’d bitterly against ye P: of O [Prince of Orange].

Rawstorne entry

i0 at Preston & at prayers, & at Tom Bostockes & the Plow wth Coz: Osbaldston ‘ith’ evening.

Comment

Bellingham’s entry shows that support for the invasion was not universal, but his tone hints at his own sentiments.


November 11

Bellingham entry

Ye 11th. A fayr day. We had ye newes of ye Dutch confirm’d, and that they were gone to Exeter. Mr. Chaddock receiv’d a letter from an unknown hand wth much private newes in it.

Rawstorne entry

ii at home not well


November 12

Bellingham entry

Ye 12th. A frost. I walk’d wth Mr. Chaddock to Camell’s. I play’d and won some money att tables. Att night I was wth some freindes att Rigby’s [hostelry, location unknown], and Mrs. Chaddock came in to complaine, etc.

Rawstorne entry

i2 went to Penwortham [Priory] & my wife


November 13

Bellingham entry

Ye 13th. A hard frost. Ye [mail] bagg of Preston was forgotten at Knutsford, but came in about 5 in ye evening, and brought an account of yt ye P. of O. [Prince of Orange] was possesst of Exeter, and had above 20,000 strong. There [transcriber inserts ‘is’ in brackets]  some [transcriber inserts ‘rumour or talk in brackets] of accommodation. Mr. Chaddock receiv’d another letter from ye unknown hand. I din’d wth Mr. Franks. Mr. Rycroft dyed suddinly this morning.

Rawstorne entry

i3 at Preston & at prayers


November 14

Bellingham entry

Ye 14th. A very hard frost. I walk’d wth ye Coll. to Penwortham, and din’d there, and was att the funerall of Mr. Rycroft, and came home early.

Rawstorne entry

i4 at Preston & went to Penwortham to Parson Ricrofts funerall who dyed the day before, Mr Gregory preach’d out of the Psalmes. Guide mee here by they counsell & afterwards &c


November 15

Bellingham entry

Ye 15th. The frost thawen. Severall of ye town went to ye funerall of Sr Tho. Clifton‘s only sonne; and Robert Rigby’s wife was buryed here. I was with Mr. Wamsly who preach’d a very ingenious funerall sermon.

Rawstorne entry

i5 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

The Rigby mentioned here could be either Robert Rigby, a draper living and trading in the town, or the son of Edward Rigby, a merchant tailor living in London. Both were listed as in-burgesses on the 1682 guild rolls. [1] The first seems the more likely candidate here. Grace was the draper’s wife’s name. [2]

[1] W. A. Abram, The Rolls of Burgesses at the Guilds Merchant of the Borough of Preston, Co. of Lancaster, 1397-1682 (Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, 1884), 174, https://archive.org/details/rollsburgessesa00langoog.
[2] ‘Lancashire OnLine Parish Clerk Project – District of Preston’, accessed 9 February 2017, http://www.lan-opc.org.uk/Preston/Preston/stjohn/index.html.

November 16

Bellingham entry

Ye 16th. A dry day. Severall of ye town went to meet ye Curate, who brought home his wife. Ye newes was that severall had gone to ye K[ing]. Att night I was wth Lewt Stanly, and after wth Mr. Rishton, Hornby, and Wamsly, a parson, [this is probably George Walmsley, although it is somewhat strange to style an acquaintance ‘a parson’ in a diary] about R. Rishton’s poast office affayer.

Rawstorne entry

i6 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

Ralph Rishton was the Preston postmaster at this time whose affairs were bringing him to ruin, and putting at risk his friends who had gone surety for him (see fuller account). It is unclear which of the Stanleys the lieutenant was. There were two branches of the family involved in the town at this time: one was represented by Sir Thomas Stanley, who had recently married Thomas Patten‘s daughter, and the other by James Stanley, the Earl of Derby‘s brother, who was shortly to be returned unopposed as one of the town’s two MPs. James Stanley was reported to be serving with William of Orange in the west country. The Hornby mentioned would be one of the Hornbys of Poulton, who Bellingham mentions visiting in his entry for .5 February 1689. It was probably Edmund Hornby, who was a lawyer and brother-in-law of Rishton.


November 17

Bellingham entry

Ye 17th. Some frost and very dry. I was wth Mr. Rishton‘s freindes. After I was wth Mr. Fleetwood and others, and we had an account given by Mr. Stanly [see previous comment], Clifton, and Laban [?] that the Ld Delamare was risen and gathering men att Manchester; and about 9 att night we had it confirm’d by one Hugh Gorny, a carrier who goes from this town to Manchester, who sayd that he saw ye Lord himselfe att ye head of 60 horse, and that it was reported that severall of the town would rise wth him.

Rawstorne entry

i7 at Preston & at prayers. this day My Bro: ffleetwood & Cousin Greenhalgh [not identified] Joyned wth mee in [transcriber  inserts ‘a’ in brackets]  Surrender of Newhall & the [transcriber inserts ‘demea’sne’ in brackets] for security for a thousand pounds to one framton of London to 60l annu & the stocke at 3 years end. x

Comment

Lord Delamere was one of the earliest and most ardent supporters of the Revolution. He was an arch rival of the Earl of Derby, although they had formed an uneasy alliance at this time. Rawstorne appears to have borrowed £1000 for three years at six percent on the security of his New Hall estate.


November 18

Bellingham entry

Ye 18th. A very cold, dry day. Our newes that ye Ld Lovelace was apprehended att Ceirencester wth 13 more, after having made a sharp resistance and killed major Loveage and his sonne of ye militia, yt severall gen: are joyn’d Ld Delamere, and yt he designs for Yorkshire. I was wth Coll:  [Rawstorne] and Capt. Greene [not identified] att Mitton’s.

Rawstorne entry

i8 at Preston Church heard th’ Vicar & Mr ffarand

Comment

Lord Lovelace was an early supporter of William of Orange who was captured with his troop on 8 November and jailed at Gloucestor. William’s supporters in the town freed him and he raised a new troop and marched to Oxford. [1] Support for William in the North-West would seem to have been growing, judging by the reports of gentry joining Delamere.

[1] Steve Pincus, 1688: The First Modern Revolution (Yale University, 2009), 244; John Lingard, A History of England, 3rd ed., vol. 14 (London: Baldwin and Cradock, 1831), 247.

November 19

Bellingham entry

Ye 19th. A frost and much snow. Nabby [wife] was not well. I was wth Coll: [Rawstorne], Capt. Greene, mr. mayor, etc., att Cowper’s [hostelry, not identified]

Rawstorne entry

i9 at Preston & at prayers, & dyned wth Mr Langton & Coz: Greenhalgh & my wife. wth us was after at James Cowpers, wth Mr Mayor & others


November 20

Bellingham entry

Ye 20th. A great thaw. We had an account of Ld Cornburyes revolt wth 3 Regements of horse and dragoons to ye P. of O [Prince of Orange]. I was att night wth Coll: [Rawstorne] and severall others in ye weend [Main Sprit Weind], etc.

Rawstorne entry

20 at Preston & at prayers

Comment

Lord Cornbury, son of the Earl of Clarendon, had attempted to lead three regiments over to William of Orange on 10 November but had been thwarted by his officers. He fled to William on his own, where he was soon followed by other former supporters of James II, including Lord Churchill. [1]

[1] Lingard, A History of England, 14:248–49.

November 21

Bellingham entry

Ye 21th. Much snow and then a thaw. Ye Earl of Derby came to this town about 12 of ye clock. He was wth ye militia officers that afternoon. Att night he was treated by the mayor att Mr. Hodghkinson‘s. I sup’t there and sate up till 5 in ye morning. Some justices were sworn, but Mr. Bradill refus’d. An express came to my Ld about 2 to suppress ye Ld Delamere.

Rawstorne entry

2i at Preston & went to meet my Ld o’ Derby to Rible bridg dyned wth him at Ancor, hee lodg’d at Mr Hodgkinsons

Comment

The militia officers would have been summoned in response to William of Orange’s invasion; Rawstorne was probably colonel of the earl’s militia regiment at this time (see Lancashire militia entry). Mr Bradill would be Thomas Braddyll. For Derby’s troubled relation with Delamere, see his entry.


November 22

Bellingham entry

Ye 22th. A very wett day. My Lord [Derby] dind and was accompany’d by severall towards Wiggan. I was ill wth sitting upp so late.

Rawstorne entry

22 at Preston, my Ld went away about i2 was after at Mitre wth Capt. Ashton & others

Comment

Ashton, possibly Richard Assheton of Cuerdale, would have been a militia officer.


November 23

Bellingham entry

Ye 23th. Some wett this morning. Here came an express from ye Lord Darby to Coll Rawstorne to bring all the Regiment to Wiggan, that his Lordship had receiv’d information that there were designes against his life, and that some men were sent to apprehend him, and therefore commanded all the help imaginable to come to secure his person. I was lett blood this day for the paine in my shoulder which was very violent. Att night I was wth Sr Chr Phillipson [of Crook Hall, Kendal] and his brother att the Anchor, and G. Foxcroft [not identified], Mr. Fletcher [not identified], and R. Rishton.

Rawstorne entry

23 at preston & went to Wygan

Comment

A fuller account of Derby’s concern is found in a letter from William Fleming to Sir Daniel Fleming:

On Sunday last a sick soldier confessed there was a design among the new raised soldiers to kill the Lords Derby and Strange. On Thursday night Lord Derby’s house was beset with the intention of blowing it up or firing it, and he was forced to raise a guard with pitch forks and staff’s to guard him to Wigan, where he and his family remain, and he sent for Colonel Rostren and his regiment to guard him … [1]

The threat would seem to come from new recruits to the militia, pointing to divided loyalties among the troops.

[1] Historical Manuscripts Commission (Twelth Report, Appendix, Part VII) The Manuscripts of S. H. Le Fleming Esq, of Rydal Hall (Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1890), 221–22.

November 24

Bellingham entry

Ye 24th. A fayr day. My paine increases. I was for some time wth Mr. Fleetwood and others att Cowpers [hostelry, location unknown] and ye mitre.

Rawstorne entry

24 at Wygan dyned wth my Ld. [Derby] At Coll Daniells [not identified]


November 25

Bellingham entry

Ye 25th. A very wett day. I sweat and was visited in ye evening by ye mayor and severall others. I this received ye R. decl. [royal declaration] from C. F. [?] and shewed it ye mayor. A stranger preach’d.

Rawstorne entry

25 at Wygan church heard Mr Haddens [not identified]


November 26

Bellingham entry

Ye 26th. A fayr day. Capt. Piggott’s and Rigby’s  companyes drew upp in ye Market Place. I was att Rigby’s [hostelry, location not identified] wth Dr Lee and others, and sup’t and playd att cards att my cousen Johnson‘s.

Rawstorne entry

26 at Wygan [this and the next three days bracketed with ” these days wth souldiers there”]

Comment

The captains would have been leading militia companies and would probably have been Robert Piggott and a member of the local Rigby family, represented in Preston at this time by Alexander Rigby and his nephew, Edward.


November 27

Bellingham entry

Ye 27th. A frost. We had an account of Yorke being seized by Lord Danby, Dunblane, Fairfax, &c., and yt ye militia had joyn’d them. I was att night wth ye mayor, Capt. Rigby, G. Rigby, and others.

Rawstorne entry

27 at Wygan

Comment

The Earl of Danby had been Charles II’s first minister before falling out of favour. He returned to politics under James II, leading the Tories in the Lords, and was one of the seven politicians who wrote to William of Orange inviting him to invade England. Dunblane would have been his son, Viscount Osborne. Fairfax would have been Thomas Fairfax, colonel in the Yorkshire militia.

The Rigbys would be members of the local Rigby family.


November 28

Bellingham entry

Ye 28th. A frost. I din’d att Camells wth Mr. Fleetwood, Parker, and severall others, and att night was wth Mr. Rich. Percivall, of Manchester [not identified], etc.

Rawstorne entry

28 at Wygan

Comment

‘Parker’ could be Christopher Parker or one of the Browsholme Parkers.


November 29

Bellingham entry

Ye 29th. A frost. We had an account of ye desertion of Prince George, D of Ormond and Grafton, Lds Churchill, Arran, Coll. Berkeley, and severall others. I sup’t att ye Mitre wth Dr. Lee, Mr. Lemman, Greefeild [Christopher or Thomas], etc.

Rawstorne entry

29 at Wayan [Wigan]

Comment

The desertions, which happened on 23 and 24 of November, represented a major blow for James II. [1]

[1] Lingard, A History of England, 14:254–55.

November 30

Bellingham entry

Ye 30th. A frost. Dean Ward was here. He tould me of ye discorse between Dr Owens and one Lancaster, att Prescott, about ye birth of ye P. of W [Prince of Wales], wch a woman overheard, and that it was a sham and nothing more.

Rawstorne entry

[No entry]

Comment

The birth of the Prince of Wales in June had caused considerable consternation to Protestants for it raised the prospect of a Catholic successor to James II, rather than his Protestant daughter, Mary. It was claimed that the baby was not the king’s son, but had been smuggled into the queen’s chamber in a bed pan.